SPECT/CT

Equipment

In 2011 Ruby Hall Clinic acquired Pune’s “First” variable angle Dual Head –SPECT-Gamma System. After using this system to the “Best” of its capabilities we have decided with something. That is the latest and the “Best” available Globally at this point of time.

GE “NM-CT 860”is GE Health Care’s. One top of line SPECT-CT system launched in Nov. 2018 and our department is proud owner of one of the First Five Systems globally, First in Asia.

Technology

Till now we visualized function of various organ system using SPECT Gamma Camera System. Now to help our referring Clinicians are adding diagnostic CT (Anatomical) Imaging to these studies. This fusion images of function and anatomy combined with quantitative information will be a great help for diagnosis and planning.

  • Thyroid Scan
  • Stress Thallium
  • Rest Thallium (Viability Scan)
  • Dobutamine Stress Thallium
  • Renogram
  • Whole Body Bone Scan (SPECT-CT)
  • DMSA
  • Lung VQ – Scan
  • Liver Scan
  • Brain SPECT
  • GI Bleed Scan

List of Procedures Scan

Thyroid Scan

Thyroid scan is only modality that can differentiated between hyperthyroidism and thyroiditis. If patient has hyperthyroidism, it can be treated with oral Radioiodine solution dose, which is internationally accepted treatment (no need of surgery) in 70% cases. After the treatment the thyroid gland is killed, the patient needs to take hormone replacement for life.

Stress Thallium

2 hrs fasting. No beta-blockers on previous day. Study time 2-3 hrs. Report same day. When the patient arrives in the department, the initial registration formalities are completed including consent. Patient is taken inside for the scanning procedure. The first part includes a treadmill stress test and at the peak, a small radioactive tracer injection is given. Patient is than taken for imaging. After the imaging is done, one small injection is given once again for resting study. Approximately 1-1/2 hrs later resting images are required.

Rest Thallium (Viability Scan)

The tracer is administered most commonly by injection through the vein, and for some tests orally or by inhalation.

Dobutamine Stress Thallium

It depends on the type of test. Since the localization of the radiotracer varies with the physiological behavior of the organ and the characteristics of the tracer, the time for optimal localization varies from organ to organ. Sometimes two tests are needed for some disease entities such as with cardiac studies. For example, a lung scan needs only half an hour, a heart study may take 2 – 3 hours, and yet other tests may take 24-48 hours to complete.

Renogram

No preparation. Total test time 1- 1½ hrs. Report same day. After initial formalities, patient will be taken for scanning. The scanning involves intravenous injection of small amount of Radioactive tracer (Not a Contrast), and serial images of kidneys for 30 min (1 image every min). Patient has to sleep quietly, while Gamma Camera takes pictures of kidneys.

In kids and infants, the test can take more time, as it involves, putting IV line sometimes, by experts, or by putting them to sleep using mild sedatives.

Whole Body Bone Scan (SPECT-CT)

No preparation. Total test time 3-4 hrs. Report same day. When the patient arrives in the department, the initial registration formalities are completed including consent. A small intravenous injection is given to which contains small amount of Radioactive material (Not a Contrast or Dye) which spreads in the bones over next couples of hrs.
The patient will be asked to come for scanning 2-3 hrs after injection. During this time patient can have normal meals, should take plenty of fluids and pass urine more frequently without contaminations of the undergarments. The scan will be completed in 20-30 min.

DMSA

Nuclear medicine tests are very sensitive and can detect some diseases at early stages. Unlike MRI and CT studies that give only structural information, nuclear medicine tests provide information about the physiological or functional status and viability of different organs and tissues.

Lung VQ – Scan

Nuclear medicine tests are very sensitive and can detect some diseases at early stages. Unlike MRI and CT studies that give only structural information, nuclear medicine tests provide information about the physiological or functional status and viability of different organs and tissues.

Liver Scan

No preparation. Total time 1-1½ hrs.  Report same day. After initial formalities, patient will be taken for scanning procedure. The procedure involves, one small intravenous injection of radioactive tracer is given and images of the abdomen are taken for 5-10 mins.

Brain SPECT

No preparation. Total time 2 hrs. Report same day. Small amount of Radioactive tracer is injected intravenously. Patient imaging is done 20-30 min after injection. Gamma camera takes images of patient’s head by rotating around 360 degrees. The imaging is over in 15-20 mins.

GI Bleed Scan

Nuclear medicine tests are very sensitive and can detect some diseases at early stages. Unlike MRI and CT studies that give only structural information, nuclear medicine tests provide information about the physiological or functional status and viability of different organs and tissues.

FAQs

What is Nuclear Medicine?

Nuclear Medicine is a medical specialty in which the diagnosis and treatment of human diseases are made by the use of a small number of radioactive tracers. After administration of the tracer, images of the organ of interest in the patient’s body are obtained with a gamma camera that shows the localization of the tracer in the organ, and physicians interpret them for the diagnosis of disease. Certain diseases are treated with high energy radiotracers in nuclear medicine based on the concept that high dose.

How is a nuclear medicine study performed?

The patient is given intravenously, for some studies orally or by inhalation, a small dosage of a radiotracer specific for an organ under study. Some studies require that the patient exercise or receive a drug that dilates the arteries in the heart. The tracer localizes in the organ and emits gamma radiations that are detected by a special camera to form an image of the organ. Imaging of the organ is performed immediately, hours or days after administration of the tracer, depending on the type of study. The duration of imaging itself ranges from 15 to 120 minutes for different studies. Most tests require the patient to lie down on a bed, while others require the patient to sit. Some tests require taking many short pictures of the organ serially followed by one long picture at the end. Nuclear physicians interpret the images and can see any abnormality in the image either as a ‘hot’ area with increased localization of the tracer or a cold spot with decreased localization of the tracer, depending on the property of the tracer.

How is the tracer administered?

The tracer is administered most commonly by injection through the vein, and for some tests orally or by inhalation.

How long does a nuclear medicine test take?

It depends on the type of test. Since the localization of the radiotracer varies with the physiological behavior of the organ and the characteristics of the tracer, the time for optimal localization varies from organ to organ. Sometimes two tests are needed for some disease entities such as with cardiac studies. For example, a lung scan needs only half an hour, a heart study may take 2 – 3 hours, and yet other tests may take 24-48 hours to complete.

Are there any side effects from these studies?

Because the administered radioactive dosages contain only a minimal amount of the carrier drug, no significant adverse or allergic reactions from the drug is commonly encountered. A patient receives a certain amount of radiation dose from nuclear medicine studies which is comparable to a diagnostic X-ray.

What are the benefits of nuclear medicine?

Nuclear medicine tests are very sensitive and can detect some diseases at early stages. Unlike MRI and CT studies that give only structural information, nuclear medicine tests provide information about the physiological or functional status and viability of different organs and tissues.

Other Super Specialities

Bariatric and Metabolic Surgery
Breast Cancer Surgery
Cardiac Sciences
Cosmetic Surgery
Gastroenterology
Hematology
Intensive Care
Interventional Radiology
IVF and Endoscopy
Laparoscopic Surgery
Molecular Imaging & Nuclear Medicine
Multi Organ Transplant
Neuro Sciences
Neuro Trauma
Orthopedics & Joint Replacement
Oncology Cancer Services
Paediatric Endocrinology
Paediatrics & Neonatology
Paediatrics Surgery
Pancreatic, Liver & Biliary Diseases
Robotic Services
Spine Surgery
Urology
Vascular Surgery